Books

Even though Spumoni Press is a brand new publishing company, we already have three books published, with one just arriving in fall 2011.

Corporate Ties

Jason Harris has found the perfect job as a web developer with a Fortune 500 financial subsidiary. He meets his cool and quirky coworkers and even scores a date with an Indian princess/database administrator.

This lasts all of eight days. Due to “organizational restructuring,” the parent company announces that all employees at Jason's location are being relocated to corporate headquarters in another state.

Each person mulls the idea of exchanging a laid-back, business casual dress environment for a cafeteria, a fitness center, and a strangling — by a necktie (corporate attire only, please) and organizational bureaucracy.

The men and women in suits arrive to document the documents, proactivate the buzzwords, and cage the project managers.

Is the job really worth it? And why exactly do people give up their independence to become company drones?

Gnonsense - An As the Grass Grows collection

As the Grass Grows follows the adventures of a neurotic yard gnome named Gnorm, who is convinced he's the only thing standing between his home and utter annihilation.

In this first collection of the online comic strip, Gnorm and his faithful sidekick, Jack, must do whatever is necessary to defend their yard. Whether it's an invasion of ants from below, birds from above or a strike that could destroy the gnomish way of life, no threat is too dangerous or too ridiculous.

The Developers

Matt Severnson has assembled a team of hard-working, quasi-geek individuals to build a revolutionary website for a northern Michigan city. The system becomes a big hit despite the group members' idiosyncratic traits. Fast food addiction, incessant sexual tension and heated bingo competition constantly distract the team. While the opportunity arises to build the first nationwide, government-sponsored high-speed Internet portal, the issue comes second to Matt's relationship with Katy, the team's co-leader. They cannot hate each other enough to halt their steamy romance, but they can't love each other enough to share anything but a fish dinner.

The Developers mixes the insane and obscene with technology, romance and pop culture. But while the book's web development group tries to make its mark on the virtual world, it encounters pre-eminent issues that will soon be shaping the Internet of the future: Are individuals losing their remaining privacy due to the World Wide Web? Will online social interaction eventually replace in-person gatherings as a necessary means?